Archive:

Posts for tag: cosmetic dentistry

By Osprey Dental, LLC
January 30, 2015
Category: Dental Procedures
FrequentlyAskedQuestionsAboutToothWear

What is tooth wear?
“Tooth wear” refers to a loss of tooth structure that can make your teeth appear shorter or less even than they used to be. Wear starts with loss of outer covering of the teeth, known as enamel. Although enamel is the hardest structure in the human body — even harder than bone — it can wear away over time. If enough enamel is lost, the softer inner tooth structure known as dentin can become exposed, and dentin wears away much faster.

What causes tooth wear?
Tooth wear can be caused by any of the following:

  • Abrasion: This is caused by a rubbing or scraping of the teeth. The most common source of abrasion is brushing too hard or using a toothbrush that is not soft enough. A removable dental appliance, such as a partial dentures or retainer, can also abrade teeth. Abrasion can also result from habits such as nail-biting and pen-chewing.
  • Attrition: This is caused by teeth contacting each other. Habits that you might not even be aware of — such as grinding or clenching your teeth — can be quite destructive over time. That’s because they can subject teeth to 10 times the normal forces of biting and chewing.
  • Erosion: Acid in your diet can actually erode (dissolve) the enamel on your teeth. Many sodas, sports drinks and so-called energy drinks are highly acidic; so are certain fruit juices. Eating sugary snacks also raises the acidity level in your mouth. If you can’t give up these snacks and drinks entirely, it’s best to confine them to mealtimes so your mouth doesn’t stay acidic throughout the day. Swishing water in your mouth after eating or drinking acidic or sugary substances can also help prevent erosion.
  • Abfraction: This refers to the loss of tooth enamel at the “necks” of the teeth (the part right at the gum line). This type of wear is not thoroughly understood, though it is believed to result from excessive biting forces. Abrasion and erosion can contribute to this problem.

How is it treated?
The first step in treating any type of tooth wear is to determine the cause during a simple oral examination right here at the dental office. Once the cause has been identified, we can work together to reduce the stresses on your teeth. For example, you may need a refresher course on gentle, effective brushing techniques; or you might benefit from some changes to your diet. If you have a clenching or grinding habit, we can make you a nightguard that will protect your teeth during sleep or periods of high stress. Once we have dealt with the underlying cause, we can make your teeth look beautiful again by replacing lost tooth structure with bonding, veneers, or crowns. This will also allow your bite to function properly again.

If you have any concerns about tooth wear, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can learn more by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “How and Why Teeth Wear.”

By Osprey Dental, LLC
December 30, 2013
Category: Dental Procedures
HowDoILookAfterMyNewPorcelainVeneers

You've just had porcelain laminate veneers placed on your teeth to improve their appearance, color and shape. Now what? How do you maintain them and keep them looking their best?

A dental porcelain veneer is a thin layer of porcelain that is bonded to a tooth, replacing the enamel (the outermost layer of a tooth). Dental porcelain is a glass-like substance that can be used to mimic natural tooth enamel perfectly because of its bright, reflective and translucent (see-through) qualities.

To look after your veneers, it is important to maintain the health of the teeth on which they were placed, and of the surrounding gums.

  • About a week after your veneers have been placed, return to our office so that we can check them to make sure they are functioning well.
  • Brush and floss regularly using non-abrasive fluoride toothpaste; make sure you remove biofilm, the film of bacteria that collects on the teeth, every day. Flossing or brushing will not harm your veneers.
  • We recommend regular dental checkups to review the state of your veneers and your dental health in general.

Porcelain is a ceramic glass-like material, and like glass it is strong but brittle and can fracture when placed under too much stress.

  • You can eat almost all foods without harming your veneers, but avoid biting into hard things like candy apples.
  • Many people habitually grind or clench their teeth. If you are one of them, let us know. We can make a protective bite guard that you can wear to reduce stress placed on your teeth (and your veneers) while you sleep.

With good dental hygiene, and regular dental check-ups porcelain veneers can last from seven to twenty years or even longer. This makes them a good solution that will improve your smile for years to come.

Contact us today to schedule an appointment or to discuss your questions about porcelain laminate veneers. You can also learn more by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Smile Design Enhanced with Porcelain Veneers.”

By Osprey Dental, LLC
September 13, 2013
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: cosmetic dentistry  
YouCanPutOnaGreatFacewithVeneersandCrowns

Smiling feels great and makes others feel good as well. But if you are self-conscious about exposing teeth that are showing imperfections or excessive wear, you may not be smiling as broadly as you should be. Fortunately, there are ways to correct the esthetic issues that might be holding you back. One involves covering the natural tooth partly or completely with a natural-looking but flawless “facade.”

Perhaps you've heard about dental veneers and crowns? Both can achieve similar, eye-pleasing results by changing the shape and color of your teeth and even helping to compensate for uneven spacing or alignment. And both are custom-designed for your teeth. So what's the difference and which is right for you?

One distinguishing feature is the amount of tooth each covers. A veneer is a wafer-thin layer of dental porcelain that bonds to the front of your tooth. A crown, also fashioned from dental porcelain, fits over and covers the entire existing tooth, like a hood, right down to the gum. With either approach, to ensure the best, most natural fit, some of the natural tooth structure must be reduced by a minimal amount. In the case of veneers, up to 1 mm of tooth enamel — about the thinness of a fingernail — is removed. Crowns are generally thicker than veneers, so in their case the removal of at least 2 mm of tooth is needed.

Another difference between veneers and crowns is the situations in which one might be more suitable than the other to achieve the desired results. For example, a crown may be necessary when too much tooth structure has been lost to decay or other problems, or for use on back teeth that have to withstand greater impact from biting and chewing. A dental professional can make a recommendation based on your goals, the condition of the tooth or teeth in question, and other factors.

Either way, both veneers and crowns are an excellent solution for a range of esthetic concerns — from poor tooth color/staining, chips and cracks, and excessive wear at the bottom of teeth (from bruxism, a term for teeth grinding) to making small teeth look larger, closing minor gaps between teeth, and making slight corrections in alignment.

If you would like more information about veneers and crowns, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine articles “Porcelain Crowns & Veneers” and “Porcelain Veneers: Strength & Beauty As Never Before.”

By Osprey Dental, LLC
May 15, 2013
Category: Oral Health
TreatmentOptionsForStainedTeeth

Do your teeth stain easily? Are you worried that your new white fillings won't remain white for very long? Staining generally falls into one of two categories — extrinsic (external) staining, which affects the outside of the teeth, and intrinsic (internal) staining, which is discoloration of the tooth structure itself. The good news is that both can be treated and, once we determine the exact cause, there are a number of options to remedy it. You can have whiter teeth in almost no time!

External staining is generally caused by beverages or foods like red wine, tea, coffee and some spices, or even substances like tobacco. Stain that is brown, black or gray can become even worse in the presence of dental bacterial plaque and when the mouth is dry. On the other hand, internal tooth staining can make the teeth appear more yellow as a natural result of aging, or after root canal treatment when tooth structure can become more brittle and dry.

Treatment for external (extrinsic) staining includes:

  • Lifestyle modification: You can help put a stop to your staining problem by reducing or eliminating the habits that cause it, such as smoking and drinking red wine.
  • Practicing efficient oral hygiene: Preventing extrinsic staining can be as simple as brushing twice a day with toothpaste that contains tooth-whitening agents or other solutions to reduce the appearance of stains. Don't be embarrassed to ask our office about brushing and flossing because most people do it wrong until they're properly instructed.
  • Professional Cleaning: We can remove some extrinsic staining with ultrasonic cleaning followed by polishing with an abrasive prophylactic paste.

Other treatment options to reverse either intrinsic or extrinsic staining include:

  • Whitening by bleaching: Bleaching for extrinsic stains can be performed either in our office or at your home using a whitening kit. Bleaching for internal (intrinsic) stains can only be conducted in our dental office because it typically involves bleaching the tooth or teeth from the inside.
  • Fillings and restorations: For teeth that have been stained due to decay, or for fillings that are old and discolored we can remove the decay and restore the teeth, which will restore them to their natural brighter color.

If you are ready to say goodbye to your stained teeth, call our office today to make an appointment. For more information about treating stained teeth, read the Dear Doctor magazine article “Tooth Staining: Getting To The Cause Of Tooth Discoloration Is The First Step Toward Successful Treatment.”

By Osprey Dental, LLC
April 20, 2013
Category: Dental Procedures
TeethWhiteningTipsforTeens

Once an exclusive procedure reserved for movie stars and millionaires, teeth whitening has become increasingly popular among all sectors of the population — including teens. While long-standing research has proven the process to be safe and effective, there are a few things everyone should know in order to make the experience as pleasant and successful as possible.

Teens, perhaps even more than others, can benefit from the confidence that comes with a healthy smile. And, because sensitivity of the gums is rarely a problem in younger people, their whitening treatments are less likely to cause discomfort. However, it's important for teens (and everyone else) to get treatments under the watchful eye of a dentist. Why?

For one thing, immature adult teeth are relatively vulnerable to the whitening process. And for young and old alike, a discolored tooth may be a symptom of an underlying dental problem, like an abscess or a root canal infection. These problems must be treated before the whitening process is begun. Also, teeth can't always be lightened to the same degree, and existing or planned dental work may have an impact on the whitening procedure. So it's best to come in and see us before you begin any tooth whitening treatment.

There are generally three methods used in tooth-whitening: in-office treatments with concentrated bleach application, at-home treatments with custom-made trays and appropriate dentist-supplied bleach, and over-the-counter (OTC) products. All use a type of peroxide to lighten the teeth, and all are safe when used as directed, under a dentist's supervision.

So what's the difference? Time! One study showed as few as three in-office visits were needed to lighten tooth color by six shades — a change that required 16 days with OTC products. Many opt for the cost-effective middle ground of custom-tray bleaching, which can achieve the same whitening in one week.

But what's especially important for a teen is that a dentist becomes involved in his or her treatment. In some cases, over-enthusiastic young people have used OTC bleach excessively, causing severe damage to the enamel layer of their teeth.

If you would like more information about teeth whitening for teens, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about these issues by reading the Dear Doctor magazine articles “Tooth Whitening Safety Tips” and “Important Teeth Whitening Questions Answered.”



Osprey Dental LLC

3976 Destination Drive #203.  Osprey, FL34229

(941)375-8505

 

Delia Cotera, DDS
Zachary Kesling, DDS


Read more about our doctors