Archive:

Posts for: October, 2014

By Osprey Dental, LLC
October 28, 2014
Category: Oral Health
Tags: oral health   oral cancer  
WarningChewingTobaccoISHazardoustoYourOralHealth

Chewing tobacco has a certain cachet among its users, especially young boys and men, who believe using it makes them appear macho or “cool.” They also believe this “smokeless” variety (as it's often marketed by tobacco companies) is safer than cigarettes or cigars.

Unfortunately, nothing could be further from the truth. In reality, chewing tobacco is harmful to your health — and especially your oral health. Regular use of these products can lead to severe dental and mouth conditions resulting in disease, disfigurement, or even death.

Like the smoked variety, chewing tobacco infuses its users with nicotine, a chemical stimulant naturally produced by the tobacco plant. The body responds to the stimulant's effect and begins to crave it, leading to addiction.

The problem, though, is the other ingredients in chewing tobacco: more than thirty other substances known to cause various kinds of cancer, including oral. Oral cancer alone is extremely dangerous: many patients suffer partial or complete loss of oral tissue and facial structures, including the tongue, lower jaw or even the face. Some even lose their lives — statistics show that only half of those with oral cancer survive more than five years after diagnosis.

Although cancer may be the most harmful effect of chewing tobacco, it isn't the only one. Researchers have found tobacco users have higher rates of tooth decay and gum disease than non-users. Tobacco also causes cosmetic and hygiene problems, including tooth staining and chronic bad breath.

If you're a tobacco user in any form, and especially chewing or spit tobacco, as your dentist we would advise you to consider quitting the habit. Giving up tobacco will not only improve your oral health and appearance, it may even save your life.

If you would like more information on the dangers of chewing tobacco, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Chewing Tobacco.”


By Osprey Dental, LLC
October 17, 2014
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: dental implants  
DentalImplantSurgeryisaRoutineWorry-FreeProcedure

Dental implantation is the premier option for tooth replacement available today. While acquiring dental implants does involve a surgical procedure, don’t let that deter you — with proper preparation the procedure is relatively minor and routine.

Implants are root replacements inserted directly into the jawbone to which a life-like, artificial crown is secured (strategically placed implants can also support fixed bridges or removable dentures). They’re typically made of titanium, which is osseophilic or “bone-loving”: bone will grow and adhere to the implant over a few weeks time.

Pre-planning can help minimize discomfort during and after the implantation procedure. We first conduct a radiographic examination of the site with x-rays or CT imaging; this enables us to assess the site’s bone quality and quantity. We can also create a surgical guide from the imaging to pinpoint the precise location for an implant to ensure a successful outcome.

Before beginning the procedure, we numb the area with a local anesthesia (we can also administer a sedative or other relaxation medication if you’re experiencing mild apprehension). The procedure often begins by creating a flap opening in the gum tissue with a few small incisions to access the bone. Using the surgical guide, we then begin a drilling sequence into the bone that progressively increases the size of the hole until it precisely matches the size and shape of the implant.

When the site preparation is complete, we remove the implant from its sterile packaging (which minimizes the chance of infection) and immediately insert it into the prepared site. We verify proper positioning with more x-rays and then suture the flap opening of the gum tissue back into place.

Thanks to both the pre-planning and care taken during surgery, you should only experience minimal discomfort. While narcotic pain relievers like codeine or hydrocodone may be prescribed, most often non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs like aspirin or ibuprofen are all that’s needed. We may also prescribe an anti-bacterial mouthrinse (with chlorhexidine) to assist healing.

In just a few weeks your custom-made restorations will be attached to the implants. It’s the completion of a long but not difficult journey; the resulting smile transformation, though, can last for many years to come.

If you would like more information on dental implants, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Dental Implant Surgery.”


By Osprey Dental, LLC
October 03, 2014
Category: Oral Health
Tags: tooth decay  
TheTaleoftheToothworm

Ever wonder just exactly what causes cavities? Once upon a time, “Toothworms” — miniscule, yet relentless pests — were thought to be responsible for this widespread malady. This belief persisted from ancient times through the 17th Century; William Shakespeare even made reference to the baneful beasts in his play Much Ado about Nothing. (“What, sigh for a toothache? [It] is but a humor or a worm.”) Today, however, we know why no one ever observed an honest-to-goodness toothworm: it’s because they’re much too tiny to see with the naked eye.

Actually, it isn’t worms, but much smaller organisms that cause tooth decay. These harmful plaque bacteria (along with many helpful microorganisms) live in the mouth, and build up on surfaces of the teeth when they aren’t cleaned properly. They feed on sugar in the diet, and release substances that erode tooth enamel, which causes small holes called cavities. Cavities, in turn, are what’s responsible for most toothaches.

While we may scoff at old legends, one fact remains: Even today, according to the National Institutes of Health, tooth decay is the number one chronic disease of both children and adults; and it’s almost entirely preventable. We can’t blame it on toothworms — but what can we do about it?

Glad you asked! The best way to avoid decay is through prevention. That means brushing your teeth twice a day with a fluoride toothpaste, and flossing them every day. It also means eating a balanced diet and avoiding acidic and sugary foods — like soda, some juices, and sweet, sticky snacks. If you do consume these types of foods, limit them to mealtimes; that gives your saliva enough time in between to neutralize the acids naturally. And, of course, make an appointment see us twice a year for a complete check-up and professional cleaning.

If you do begin to notice the symptoms of tooth decay (toothache, for example) it’s important to come in to the dental office right away, so we can treat the problem before it gets worse. Prompt action can often help save a tooth that might otherwise be lost. Besides filling the cavity, we may be also able to recommend ways to help prevent the disease from affecting other teeth. And if you need a more extensive procedure to relieve the problem — such as a root canal — we can make sure you get the appropriate treatment.

We’ve come a long way since the “toothworm” days — but we can still do a lot more to make tooth decay a thing of the past.

If you would like more information about tooth decay and cavity prevention, please contact us or schedule an appointment. You can learn more in the Dear Doctor magazine article “Tooth Decay — The World’s Oldest & Most Widespread Disease” and “Tooth Decay — How To Assess Your Risk.”




Osprey Dental LLC

3976 Destination Drive #203.  Osprey, FL34229

(941)375-8505

 

Delia Cotera, DDS
Zachary Kesling, DDS


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