Archive:

Posts for: July, 2013

By Osprey Dental, LLC
July 30, 2013
Category: Oral Health
Tags: jaw pain  
DiagnosingyourJawPain

If you were recently in an accident or received a hard hit while playing sports and you have been feeling jaw pain ever since, you may be suffering from a serious injury. It is important that you make an appointment with us immediately, so that we can conduct a proper examination, make a diagnosis and prescribe a suitable treatment. Even if the pain is lessening, you should still make an appointment.

Without seeing you, we have no way of definitively diagnosing the cause of your pain. However, here are a few possibilities:

  1. You displaced a tooth or teeth.
  2. You indirectly traumatized or injured the jaw joint (TMJ — temporomandibular joint). This trauma will cause swelling in the joint space, and the ball of the jaw joint will not fully seat into the joint space. If this is the issue, it is likely that your back teeth on the affected side will not be able to touch. Over time, the swelling should subside, allowing the teeth to fit together normally.
  3. You may have a minor fracture of your lower jaw. The most common is a “sub-condylar” fracture (just below the head of the joint), which will persist in symptoms that are more severe than simply bruising and swelling.
  4. You may have dislocated the joint, which means the condyle or joint head has been moved out of the joint space.

All of the above injuries can also cause muscle spasms, meaning that the inflammation from the injury results in the muscles on both sides of the jaw locking it in position to stop further movement and damage.

The most critical step is for you to make an appointment with our office, so we can conduct a physical examination, using x-rays to reveal the extent of your injury. We'll also be able to see whether the injury is to the soft tissue or bone.

Treatment may involve a variety of things, including anti-inflammatory and muscle relaxant medications. If your teeth have been damaged, we'll recommend a way to fix this issue. If you have dislocated your jaw, we may be able to place it back through gentle manipulation. If you have fractured your jaw, we'll need to reposition the broken parts and splint them to keep them still, so that they can heal.

If you would like more information about jaw pain, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Jaw Pain.”


By Osprey Dental, LLC
July 15, 2013
Category: Oral Health
Tags: oral health   dry mouth  
DryMouthFAQs

Dry mouth is a condition that many of us have experienced at some point in life. However, for some people it is a problem that can wreak havoc on their lives. This is why we have put together this list of questions we are most frequently asked about dry mouth.

What is dry mouth?
The medical term for dry mouth is “xerostomia” (“xero” – dry; “stomia” – mouth) and it affects millions of people in the US alone. It is caused by an insufficient flow of saliva, the liquid produced by the salivary glands. These glands are located in the inside cheeks of the mouth by the back top molars and in the floor (under the tongue) of the mouth. When functioning properly, they produce two to four pints of liquid every 24 hours.

Can drugs contribute to dry mouth?
Yes, both prescription and over-the-counter (OTC) drugs can cause dry mouth. This is one reason we so often find it in senior citizens, as they are typically on more medications than younger, healthier people.

What about diseases...can they cause dry mouth?
Certain systemic (general body) and autoimmune (“auto” – self; “immune” – resistance system) diseases, in which the body reacts against its own tissue, can cause dry mouth. Other diseases that can be the culprit include: diabetes, Parkinson's disease, cystic fibrosis, and AIDS (Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome). Radiation and chemotherapy used to treat head and neck cancers can inflame, damage or destroy the salivary glands—thus causing dry mouth.

Are there any remedies for dry mouth?
Yes! If medication is the primary cause of your dry mouth, there may be other, similar drugs that can be substituted that do not produce the same side effect. If you feel this describes your situation, discuss your concerns with the prescribing physician. Another option is taking an OTC or prescription saliva stimulant to temporarily relieve the dryness. Or, you can suck on a candy made with xylitol, a natural sugar substitute, four to five times a day. Xylitol has been shown to help stimulate the production of saliva with the added benefit of reducing the odds of getting cavities.

To learn more on this subject, continue reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Dry Mouth.” You can also contact us today with any questions or to schedule an appointment.




Osprey Dental LLC

3976 Destination Drive #203.  Osprey, FL34229

(941)375-8505

 

Delia Cotera, DDS
Zachary Kesling, DDS

 

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